Spring 2019 Shows: Recap

Since my last post, it’s been a very active spring, artistically and otherwise. I was scheduled to do two art fairs (April 28 & May 5); it was my first time doing an outdoor fair, so preparations began well in advance. I also completed 2 new Pandagram commissions this season, prepared for (translation: “practice, practice, practice!”) and gave 2 carillon concerts, and traveled to China and Japan. (There will be paintings! Not to mention the 1,000+ photographs.)

4/28 Art Fair: Communiversity 
Wow, this was a lot of work for one person for one day. It didn’t help that my car’s trunk wouldn’t open, but with a little ingenuity, a lot of determination, and an immediate schedule to keep, I packed everything except a big painting of a Viking ship. (I did fit it in the car for the second show.) Logistically, the event could have been better organized for set-up and take-down. The streets were packed, so I lost at least 30 minutes of set-up time due to traffic and someone else parking in my booth space to unload; consequently, I wasn’t able to put everything up that I intended, including a hanging display across one side of the tent. Also, take-down was surprisingly short. Fortunately, the staff sent a post-event survey to solicit feedback. Despite various challenges, I was glad for the opportunity to test the waters and, surprisingly frequently, to improvise solutions. There were a number of adjustments I would have made at the May 5 fair the following weekend, but it was cancelled due to a heavy rain forecast. (Good thing, too–the forecast was incontestably accurate.) 

 

Click to enlarge photos. The second photo shows the side of the booth, not the front. I left the side wall rolled up to make the space more open, but left it hanging down a bit to dissuade people from hastily cutting through my booth to get through the crowds. The white circles on my shirt are Pindas.

Can’t do a booth without Pandagrams. 😉

Come back next time to see the two new panda paintings mentioned at the beginning of this post. ‘Til then, cheerio. 

Spring 2019 Shows

I’m pleased to announce that I will participate in two outdoor fairs this spring:

Communiversity, Sunday, April 28, downtown Princeton, NJ, 1-6 pm

Handmade Hopewell, Sunday, May 5, Hopewell, NJ, 10 am-4 pm

Both are 1-day shows (a gentler introduction to showing outdoors than a 2-3 day show or a week-long art fair) and are no more than a 10-minute drive away! I look forward to the short commutes. They will be very pleasant after the many less favorable long hauls I had to attend conventions in the fall.

I haven’t done an outdoor show before, so, like the times I was preparing for my first few conventions, there is a lot to think about and do. One of the first tasks was finding a suitable tent for the space. (I bought 1 that, to my durpride ended up being nearly 60 pounds — too heavy for me to tote & put up alone! That one got returned, & I found a lighter Undercover tent. (For any artists and tent-seekers out there, it’s the 10′ x 10′ Super Lightweight Tent: https://getundercover.com/product/uc-3-10×10-super-lightweight-popup-shade-wheel-bag-spikes. I purchased it from Hayneedle.com & also a set of sidewalls for a combined total of less than $200.)

I had to do some rearranging in order to put it up. Always best to do a trial run before the event.

=)

I’ve also been thinking about inexpensive but effective display ideas. Come back for a future post to see what I try out.

February 2019

Happy New Year, happy Presidents Day, and everything in between.

My art adventures took a little holiday during the holidays, and I traveled a bit as well. Between everything, I’ve quietly and slowly been working away at a handful of things on the drawing board (or, rather, the drafting table): a painting of a shipwreck from my trip to Oregon & Washington in August, custom Pandagram paintings for a client, a large painting of a Viking ship, and just a little bit of illustration for the long-time-coming John Churchmouse. 

While I work on those, please enjoy this painting from my Oregon trip (meaning the subject matter is from the trip–I painted it after I returned). Click to enlarge.

December Showings

I’m pleased to announce that 2 paintings are be part of exhibitions this winter. First, included in the Light Space Time online art gallery’s 2018 seascapes competition is the painting À la côte sud d’ Île Sainte-Marguerite, which was the subject of this post in July and was included in the competition’s Special Merit category for painting and other traditional media. Check it out: https://www.lightspacetime.art/seascapes-2018-art-exhibition-special-merit-painting-other-category.

Second is a new piece painted at the end of November for Trenton Artworks’ annual 10 x 10 Red Dot fundraiser event. (This is my first year participating.) Artists in the area are invited to create art on a 10″ x 10″ picture plane. Each piece sells at the event for $100, with proceeds being split between the artist and Artworks or, if the artist elects, 100% to Artworks. The oil painting I created for this event is called “Promising Day” and is based on photography from my travels in Oregon and Washington state in August. 

The opening reception was this past Saturday, December 8. I attended with fellow Principia art alumna and Tenacre cabinet painter Marissa Bunting. Now a few words about the name of the event: When any art sells, a red dot (sticker) is put next to the painting. Sensible enough. If any happy art collectors wish to take home their prizes before the end of the show, they can; the Artworks staff then hangs red paper plates, which are just bigger red dots, on the wall in place of the art.

Ironically, Marissa also painted coniferous trees against a cloudy blue sky for this event, and her painting also had “day” in the title. And–I kid you not–the show organizers put our paintings next to each other. What can I say? The Force is strong with this one.

PhilCon 2018

This update might be a two-for-one because on my last post (November 15), I did another test run with new subscription client settings, but the test might not have worked; I received an email with a link to the post, but I’m not sure anyone else did. Have a look at the newest Pandagram pandas: www.drawstheeventide.com/newpandas/

I am happy & relieved to report that PhilCon (Nov. 16-18) went better than the previous convention (Nov. 2-4 & noted in the above post). The drive was much easier (less than an hour, easy navigating, & no tolls) and business better–still on the slow side, but I sold a record 8 books! Additionally, my table neighbor was very friendly. Since it was a literary convention, the audience was notably different from the anime & comic con crowds–generally quieter & more mature, but this is not to say people did not get excited about their dragons, Star Wars, Tamora Pierce books, or how to shelve & preserve their hardback collections. Also, people seemed to be especially appreciative of others’ creative endeavors & would often ask about works in progress, ways to market, etc. This was probably in part due to the fact that PhilCon is hosted by an active, long-established science fiction society, so many people already knew each other, & there is already a dedicated fan base. One fellow said this year was his 50th PhilCon! 

I didn’t sketch so much as at anime conventions because “draw this character” commissions weren’t part of the convention culture, but I did do some sketching for me. (Below is an idea that began in South Australia & ended up with Scottish corsairs or explorers somewhere between the Hebrides and Scandinavia.) I also scribbled down a few pages of notes for a writing project.

Because the PhilCon dealers room hours ended earlier than other events I did this fall and the drive was shorter, I stuck around for some evening panels & events (costume contest, concert, recitation of “The Hunting of the Snark,” to name a few) before heading home. It’s a nice bonus to be able to enjoy events in addition to vending, and it’s been a while since I’ve been able to do that.

Last but not least, I hope you each had a restful, joyful Thanksgiving & will carry some of the spirit of gratitude into every day hence.